Tuesday, July 8, 2014


Santa Clara Valley Beekeepers Guild
WE Need Your Help!

My name is Brandi Madison with Healthy Alternatives to Pesticides group in the Santa Clara County.

We believe that the toxic pesticide fogging is injuring the bees, people, and environment.

If you have dead bees and feel that the reason they may have died is because of a recent pesticide fogging (spraying) that has been done in your neighborhood by Santa Clara County Vector Control, please contact Brandi Madison at 408-687-5958 or email her at: info@healthyalternativestopesticides.com
Frank Holt is the project manager for Healthy Alternatives to Pesticides (HAP). He will assist you in collecting and sending your bees for testing at no cost to you.  The cost of testing will be paid by Healthy Alternatives To Pesticides. Frank's number is 305-519-1486.
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If you are experiencing any adverse symptoms to the toxic pesticide fogging (spraying) such as headaches, rashes, respiratory problems or any other symptoms please contact Brandi Madison at 408-687-5958 or email her at: info@healthyalternativestopesticides.com

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If you would like to report a dead bird tested for possible pesticide exposure please contact Brandi Madison at 408-687-5958 or email her at: info@healthyalternativestopesticides.com

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We invite you to sign up for our HAP (Healthy Alternatives To Pesticides) newsletter to receive important news at:
http://www.healthyalternativestopesticides.com/
 



Monday, June 16, 2014

BEAUTY AND THE BEES:
ONE GARDEN AT A TIME

Everyone can plant a flower for National Pollinator Week!


Once again, it is National Pollinator Week and a fantastic time to thank the bees, butterflies, and other pollinators by giving them a hand. There are so many threats to pollinators -- pesticides, diseases, habitat loss, and more -- that one can be discouraged. But everyone can easily do one thing to help pollinators: plant a beautiful bee-friendly flowering plant.

Whether adding bee-friendly perennial wildflowers to frame your front yard, planting a pollinator hedgerow along your farm road, including bee-flowers in your vegetable garden, or just planting a pot with a sunflower on your porch, any effort to increase the number of flowers available for bees can help pollinators and beautify your home or farm. Plus, it is a great joy to watch the bees visit the flowers you plant and to share this wildlife with your friends and neighbors.

Here are some places you can go to find information about which plants are best for your area.
Don't forget to sign the Pollinator Protection Pledge and join the ever-expanding community of pollinator enthusiasts -- and enjoy yourself as we celebrate pollinators!

Find Out More:

To discover more ways to support pollinators, including ideas for creating a bee garden in your own community, visit our Bring Back the Pollinators webpage.

Thank you for doing your part! 

Sunday, June 8, 2014

Pesticide spraying by Santa Clara County Vector Control

Speak Out At The Board of Supervisor’s Meeting To Stop The Spraying (Fogging) Of Pesticides!
(Video of Sunnyvale fogging/spraying on Monday, June 2nd 2014  with a pesticide called Zenivex HERE)
Date: Tuesday, June 10th at 8:45AM – Please note we will meet a little early to talk about a strategy.
The meeting officially starts at 9:00AM.
Location:  70 West Hedding in San Jose on the first floor in the Board Chambers Room.
All speakers will receive 1 minute.

Join our Healthy Alternatives To Pesticides (HAP) meetup at:
http://www.meetup.com/healthyalternativestopesticides/

IF you want to added to our mailing list, please email Brandi at:
 healthyalternatives2pesticides@gmail.com
Please include your name, email address and phone number.

Tuesday, June 3, 2014


Nanoparticles loaded with bee venom kill HIV

Nanoparticles carrying a toxin found in bee venom can destroy human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) while leaving surrounding cells unharmed, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown. The finding is an ... Read the rest of the article at:
http://news.wustl.edu/news/Pages/25061.aspx

Friday, May 30, 2014

Shaking Things Up

Shaking Things Up: UMD Engineering Students Build Innovative Solution to Help Save Honey Bees

From left to right: Mechancial Engineering students Max Frantz, Jake Johnson, Mark Ragland and Sean Bartlett, Dr. Chang-Sei Kim (Mechanical Engineering), Andrew Garavito (UMD Entomology Lab) and Meghan McConnell (UMD Entomology Lab)Photos courtesy of Sean Bartlett and Bee Shaker Team.
From left to right: Mechancial Engineering students Max Frantz, Jake Johnson, Mark Ragland and Sean Bartlett, Dr. Chang-Sei Kim (Mechanical Engineering), Andrew Garavito (UMD Entomology Lab) and Meghan McConnell (UMD Entomology Lab)
Photos courtesy of Sean Bartlett and Bee Shaker Team.
College Park, Md.—University of Maryland (UMD) Clark School of Engineering students are leveraging their know-how to help bee biologists develop a non-chemical, mechanical solution to one of the toughest problems facing honey bee populations. As part of a cross-department collaboration between the UMD Department of Entomology and the Department of Mechanical Engineering, students, researchers and faculty are joining forces to develop a device that could help greatly reduce the number of parasitic varroa mites currently infesting honey bee colonies.
According to UMD Assistant Professor and honey bee expert Dennis vanEngelsdorp, varroa mites are one of the leading causes of mortality for European honey bees, and the number one issue challenging bee ...

Monday, May 19, 2014

POLLINATOR PROTECTOR Winner for 2014 is Orley "Chip" Taylor
Monarch Watch / Lawrence, KS -- University of Kansas
Since insect ecologist Chip Taylor founded Monarch Watch in 1992, the organization has enlisted thousands of citizens to protect the monarch butterfly from extinction. The butterfly's numbers have sunk to ten percent of what they were in 1996, largely because milkweed—the only food source for monarch larvae and where adults lay their eggs—has been wiped out by herbicides and the relentless expansion of corn and soy acres in the Midwest. Based out of the University of Kansas, Monarch Watch has enlisted hundreds of thousands of volunteers each year to track the butterfly's population and advocate for its protection. Now Taylor is on a crusade to plant new milkweed habitat through Monarch Watch's "Bring the Monarch Back" initiative. Beginning in 2005, the program has sent milkweed plugs to over 160,000 schools, parks and home gardens, creating vital fuel sources for butterflies on their migration path from Canada to Mexico. For Taylor, the monarch's decline signals a larger crisis affecting all pollinators, upon whom much of our food system and the food sources of so many animals depend.

Read Chip's blog post: Bring Back the Monarchs!
From: Catch The Buzz available at:
http://home.ezezine.com/1636/1636-2014.05.18.18.55.archive.html

Thursday, May 1, 2014

 May Bee Husbandry
  • Requeen maintaining genetic quality to meet your objectives.
  • Select stocks that are productive and disease and pest resistant.
  • Encourage high drone densities during mating season to provide well-mated queens and genetically diverse colonies.
  • Discourage stocks that are excessively defensive.
  • Control swarming by making nucs and/or splits.
  • Check hives for pests and diseases. Early detection is key.
  • Use diagnostic services for objective colony assessment.
  • Follow regional guidelines for action thresholds for Varroa and Nosema control.
Courtesy of Project Apis M